RESEARCH

Finding answers to relevant questions

Faculty at FLAME University enjoys enormous opportunities and avenues for cutting-edge research in their respective areas of specialization strengthening the vision, awareness and synergy of the inter-disciplinary approach of education.

Excellence achieved through this research, in turn, creates new learning and further enriches the diversity of knowledge by synthesizing and integrating insights from a range of disciplines. This unique academic cooperation between multiple disciplines does transcend the boundaries of disciplines, and results in an insightful and consequential research output. This process of creating synergy between excellence and diversity - a dynamic motion that advances academic learning through constant interconnectivity - is the basic driving force that refines education and research at the University.

Publications


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 SCOPUS® | Q3

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 SCOPUS® | Q2

This paper uses a linked employer-employee dataset from the Ghanaian manufacturing sector to analyze earnings dispersion in Ghana from 1992 to 2003, a period post extensive economic reforms. I find that variance of earnings increased from 1992 to 1998 and decreased thereafter, resembling an inverted u-shaped relationship. I use analysis of variance and variance decomposition approaches to understand the underlying factors that led to such a pattern in earnings inequality. I find that between-firm factors explain this pattern more than within-firm factors. I also find that the mean earnings gap between workers above and below the 90th percentile of income distribution can explain the majority of the initial surge in inequality (61 %) but only explains a very small fraction of the eventual decline (9 %). I run OLS regressions similar to Mincerian equations and decompose the variance components to find that the decline in earnings inequality is consistent with decline in variance of firm-level earnings whereas variance of predicted wage from worker characteristics have increased. I also find suggestive evidence of changing patterns of worker-firm sorting which contributes to the decline in inequality. These patterns however only hold up for private domestic firms and not for foreign-owned firms.

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 SCOPUS® | Q4

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