RESEARCH

Finding answers to relevant questions

Faculty at FLAME University enjoys enormous opportunities and avenues for cutting-edge research in their respective areas of specialization strengthening the vision, awareness and synergy of the inter-disciplinary approach of education.

Excellence achieved through this research, in turn, creates new learning and further enriches the diversity of knowledge by synthesizing and integrating insights from a range of disciplines. This unique academic cooperation between multiple disciplines does transcend the boundaries of disciplines, and results in an insightful and consequential research output. This process of creating synergy between excellence and diversity - a dynamic motion that advances academic learning through constant interconnectivity - is the basic driving force that refines education and research at the University.

Publications


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 ABDC C | SCOPUS® Q4

An efficient payment system acts as an enabler for speeding up liquidity flow in the economy, apart from ensuring proper utilization of limited resources it also eliminates systemic risks. Flow of funds across borders demands the security, integrity of the payment system and the harmonization of the systems in the related countries. The paper dwells with the need to modernize the payment system and migrate from paper-based to electronic mode of payment system to enhance efficiency and save cost. It delves in to the core of payment systems in the select countries with a comparative analysis. Benchmarking against the BIS core principles of Systemically Important Payment Systems revised as core principles of Financial Markets Infrastructure has been done to ensure convergence with the international best standards for Governance of Payment systems. The payment system of any country, though advanced and sophisticated, does face various risks, viz. bank failures, frauds, counter-party failures, etc. Such aberrations could trigger a chain-reaction that might ultimately result in disruption and distrust of the payment system. For example, if one large payment transaction cannot be settled, it disturbs other transactions leading to failure of the institutions involved in the process ultimately upsetting the entire payment system in the country. Such systematic and cascading breakdown of the payment system can hinder efficacy of monetary policy and badly impact confidence in the financial system. Minimization of systemic risk is therefore a critical challenge facing the regulators. Like in any ambitious economy, in India too, the fast advances in information technology, changes in regulatory framework, setting up of new institutions have aided to the rise of new payment practices, products and delivery channels for small as well as large value, and urgent payments. The paper shows areas for improvement in the efficiency in existing payment systems in India and the other countries especially in regard to the liquidity risk, operational risks, access criterion, transparency etc. In the end, the paper makes a modest attempt to identify opportunities and challenges for India. Numerous major changes in the payment system would take place at a quicker pace as e-commerce becomes more prevalent in the economic activities in the country

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journal
 SCOPUS® | Q3

journal
 SCOPUS® | Q2

This paper uses a linked employer-employee dataset from the Ghanaian manufacturing sector to analyze earnings dispersion in Ghana from 1992 to 2003, a period post extensive economic reforms. I find that variance of earnings increased from 1992 to 1998 and decreased thereafter, resembling an inverted u-shaped relationship. I use analysis of variance and variance decomposition approaches to understand the underlying factors that led to such a pattern in earnings inequality. I find that between-firm factors explain this pattern more than within-firm factors. I also find that the mean earnings gap between workers above and below the 90th percentile of income distribution can explain the majority of the initial surge in inequality (61 %) but only explains a very small fraction of the eventual decline (9 %). I run OLS regressions similar to Mincerian equations and decompose the variance components to find that the decline in earnings inequality is consistent with decline in variance of firm-level earnings whereas variance of predicted wage from worker characteristics have increased. I also find suggestive evidence of changing patterns of worker-firm sorting which contributes to the decline in inequality. These patterns however only hold up for private domestic firms and not for foreign-owned firms.

journal
 SCOPUS® | Q4

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